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Homeowner Insurance Coverages During Tornado Season

Unfortunately, tornado season has been a rough one this year. We have witnessed much devastation and couldn’t help but think, “I hope they had good homeowner insurance coverages”. This thought is not from a selfish standpoint, but rather a professional who knows the risks and can help people avoid total loss in the event of a covered peril.

The following video will explain how MJM Insurance of Fenton can help you.  Don’t wait until insurance companies put a freeze on writing policies! Call Today (636) 343-5000

 

Missouri Home Insurance | Protection Before Tornado Season

What’s in Your Policy? Do You Have The Right Coverages?

MJM Insurance of Fenton | Missouri Home Insurance | (636) 343-5000 First, let’s start with the safety factors for tornado season. We’re going to cover Missouri Home Insurance | Protection Before Tornado Season.  While no home can ever be made “tornado-proof,” homeowners prepare for tornadoes ahead of time can improve the odds of their home surviving high winds by taking these precautions.

According to wikipedia, a tornado watch is issued when weather conditions are favorable for the development of severe thunderstorms that are capable of producing tornadoes.  In most cases, the potential exists for large hail and/or damaging winds in addition to tornadoes.

A watch does not mean that the severe weather is actually occurring, only that atmospheric conditions have created a significant risk for it. If severe weather actually does occur, a tornado warning or severe thunderstorm warning would then be issued. Note that a watch is not required for a warning to be issued; tornado warnings are occasionally issued when a severe thunderstorm watch is active, or when no watches are in effect), if a severe thunderstorm develops and has a confirmed tornado or strong rotation.

Take these additional steps to protect yourself and your family:

  • Decide where your safe place is going to be.  An interior room, basement or local shelter.  When a tornado approaches, go there immediately. If you have no time to get to shelter, head to the center most part of your basement or home — away from windows and preferably under something sturdy like a workbench or staircase. The more walls between you and the outside, the better.
  • Become familiar with your community’s severe weather warning system and make certain every adult and teenager in your family knows what to do when a tornado watch or warning sounds.
  • Learn about your workplace’s disaster safety plans and similar measures at your children’s schools or day care centers.
  • Create a family plan in case you are able to move to a community shelter and identify escape routes from your home and neighborhood and designate an emergency meeting place for your family to reunite if you become separated.
  • Establish a contact point to communicate with concerned relatives. Keep in mind, when a tragedy hits a large geographical area, everyone is calling someone, or emergency departments from their cell phone.
  • Keep an emergency kit readily available.  Include a three-day supply of drinking water and food you don’t have to refrigerate or cook; first aid supplies; a portable weather radio; a wrench and other basic tools; a flashlight (there are flashlights with a wind up power source versus the need for batteries.  Consider extras like work gloves; portable lanterns; clothing; blankets; baby items.
  • Move anything in your yard that can become flying debris inside your house or garage before a storm strikes. Do this only if authorities have announced a tornado watch, however. If authorities have announced a tornado warning, leave it all alone.
  • Don’t open your windows. You won’t save the house, as once thought, and you may actually make things worse by giving wind and rain a chance to get inside.

A tornado can seriously impact many areas of your life – your home, your apartment, your car, your business!  WE CARE!

 

MJM Insurance of Fenton | Missouri Home Insurance | (636) 343-5000 There are many ways to purchase Missouri Home Insurance.  For homeowners to make sure they have the right protection in place, it is highly recommended to meet with a licensed insurance professional to review your policy.  There are many choices in coverages, endorsements, discounts, and more.  It can be a bit overwhelming, and our agents at MJM Insurance of Fenton can help.

Home Insurance policies in Missouri can be  very different and the price of insurance varies based off the risk of the home, location, etc.  If you can think of anything, realize that you’re not buying a commodity;  you’re protecting your financial well being…and the choices you make could affect you for the rest of your life.  After you read this post, check out our page for additional Missouri Home Insurance at Missouri Home Insurance Information.

Our motto is “Expect More. Receive More.”  MJM Insurance of Fenton is a full service independent insurance agency representing many of Missouri’s premier personal and commercial insurance carriers. With a combined experience of over 70 years in the Missouri insurance industry, our agents are knowledgeable and competent specializing in, not only home insurance, but also auto, renters, boat, motorcycle, business automobile, workers compensation, and general liability. With our utilization of cutting edge automation, we’re able to provide superior service to our clients including A+ rated insurance products.

So, let’s get together and review your homeowners insurance policy to make sure you have sufficient coverage to rebuild your life and home after a tornado. Report any property damage to your insurance agent or company representative immediately after a natural disaster and make temporary repairs to prevent further damage. For information about filing an insurance claim after a natural disaster, contact MJM Insurance of Fenton.

Here are a few link for you to become prepared, protect your family – including your pets!  

MJM Insurance of Fenton | Missouri Home Insurance | (636) 343-5000 Here in the USA, tornadoes have occurred in every month, so any time is a good time to review tornado safety procedures – for home, for school, for work, in the car, and while out and about. And if you are considering a storm shelter, take a look at Tornado Project Online to learn more about shelters.

If you don’t regularly watch or listen to the weather report, but strange clouds start moving in and the weather begins to look stormy, turn to your local radio/television station or visit www.weather.com to get the weather forecast.

Remember, if a tornado “watch” is issued for your area, it means that a tornado is “possible.”  If a tornado “warning” is issued, it means that a tornado has actually been spotted, or is strongly indicated on radar, and it is time to go to a safe shelter immediately.

Call Us – We’re Here To Help!

Source: Institute for Business and Home Safety. IBHS is a national nonprofit initiative of the insurance industry to reduce deaths, injuries, property damage, economic losses and human suffering caused by natural disasters.

 Missouri Home Insurance | Protection Before Tornado Season

Protect Your Home from Turbulent Weather

Protect Your Home from Turbulent WeatherProtect your home

Structures built to meet or exceed current model building codes for high-wind regions have a much better chance of surviving violent windstorms. Learn how to protect your home from turbulent weather by understanding the The Standard Building Code, issued by the Southern Building Code Congress International, Inc. The Standard Building Code is one source for guidance on fortifying your home against fierce winds.  Earlier this year, Office of the Governor for the state of Missouri declared May as the Building Safety Month. Although no home can withstand a direct hit from a severe tornado, solid construction will help your home survive if it’s to the side of the tornado’s path.

When inspecting your home, pay particular attention to the windows, doors, roof, gables and connections (roof-to-wall, wall-to-foundation). Residences in inland areas are typically not built to withstand high wind forces, and weaknesses in these elements of your home make it more vulnerable to significant damage.  If you’re handy with a hammer and saw, you can do much of the work yourself. Work involving your home’s structure may require a building contractor, however, or even a registered design professional such as an architect or engineer.

When working outside

  • Replace gravel/rock landscaping material with shredded bark.
  • Keep trees and shrubbery trimmed. Cut weak branches and trees that could fall on your house.

When building or remodeling

Windows: If you are replacing your existing windows, install impact-resistant window systems, which have a much better chance of surviving a major windstorm. These window systems are commonly available in hurricane-prone areas. If you are unable to find them locally, you can order them from manufacturers or home improvement stores in coastal areas.

Entry doors: Make certain your doors have at least three hinges and a dead-bolt security lock, with a bolt at least one inch long. Anchor door frames securely to wall framing.

Patio doors: Sliding glass doors are more vulnerable to wind damage than most other doors. If you are replacing your patio doors or building a new home, consider installing impact-resistant door systems made of laminated glass, plastic glazing or a combination of plastic and glass.

Garage doors: Because of their size and construction, garage doors are highly susceptible to wind damage. A qualified inspector can determine if both the door and the track system can resist high winds and, if necessary, replace them with a stronger system. Garage doors more than 8 feet wide are most vulnerable. Install permanent wood or metal stiffeners. Or contact the door manufacturer’s technical staff for recommendations about temporary center supports you can attach and remove easily when severe weather threatens.

Roofs: If you are replacing your roof, take steps to ensure that both the new roof covering and the sheathing will resist high winds. Your roofing contractor should:

  • Remove old coverings down to the bare wood sheathing.
  • Remove sheathing to confirm that rafters and trusses are securely connected to the walls.
  • Replace damaged sheathing.
  • Refasten existing sheathing according to the proper fastening schedule outlined in the current model building code for high-wind regions.
  • Install a roof covering designed to resist high winds.
  • Seal all roof sheathing joints with self-stick rubberized asphalt tape to provide a secondary moisture barrier.

If you want to give your roof sheathing added protection, but it’s not time to re-roof, glue the sheathing to the rafters and the trusses. Use an adhesive that conforms to Performance Specification AFG-01 developed by APA — The Engineered Wood Association, which you can find at any hardware store or home improvement center.

Gables: Brace the end wall of a gable roof properly to resist high winds. Check the current model building code for high-wind regions for appropriate guidance, or consult a qualified engineer or architect.

Connections: The points where the roof and the foundation meet the walls of your house are extremely important if your home is to resist high winds and the pressures they place on the entire structure.

  • Anchor the roof to the walls with metal clips and straps (most easily added when you replace your roof).
  • Make certain the walls are properly anchored to the foundation. A registered design professional can determine if these joints need retrofitting, and a qualified contractor can perform the work the design professional identifies.
  • If your house has more than one story, make certain the upper story wall framing is firmly connected to the lower framing. The best time to do this is when you remodel.

When you protect your home from turbulent weather, you will save yourself time and money.  With a combined experience of over 60 years in the insurance industry, MJM Insurance® of Fenton is a full service Independent Insurance Agency representing many of Missouri’s premier personal lines insurance carriers.  We assess risks and shop for companies to find the best coverage for the lowest price. 

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